7th Grade - Ancient World

Instructor    Lucas Rewa
Phone         269-323-5708
Building      North Middle School
Room         77
E-mail  lrewa@portageps.org 

Course Description 

The Ancient World introduces students to the beginnings of the human story. As they explore the great early civilizations of Egypt and the Near East, India, China, Greece, and Rome, students discover the secrets of these ancient cultures that continue to influence the modern world.

 

Goals

Our overarching course goals throughout the year will be to:

1) Demonstrate knowledge of the world through the disciplines of history, economics, political science and geography.

2) Use oral and written communication to inquire, gather and interpret data, form hypotheses, draw conclusions, make inferences, and support generalizations on issues drawn from historical and contemporary sources.

3) Demonstrate an overall understanding of the course objectives and state standards by passing bi-quarterly assessments.

4) Demonstrate a historical perspective in order to construct a meaningful understanding of the diverse cultural heritage of our world in order to make significant judgments regarding the world around us.

5) Participate in inquiry, decision making and public discourse to better understand the complex problems that affect our society and the world. You will then be asked to make thoughtful and informed decisions regarding the status quo, deliberate and resolve cultural, political, economic, and societal issues of enduring importance.

Goals

Our specific course goals throughout for each marking period are as follows:

Quarter 1: Era 1 The Beginnings of Human Society: Beginnings to 4000 B.C.E./B.C. Students will explain the basic features and differences between hunter-gatherer societies and pastoral nomads. Analyze and explain the geographic, environmental, biological, and cultural processes that influenced the rise of the earliest human communities, the migration and spread of people throughout the world, and the causes and consequences of the growth of agriculture.

Guiding Questions:

  1. How do social scientists interpret the past?
  2. How did the development of agriculture change daily life in the Neolithic Age?
  3. How did geographic challenges lead to the city-states of Mesopotamia?
  4. Why do historians classify ancient Sumer as a civilization?
  5. What were the most important achievements of the Mesopotamian empires?

Grade level content expectations (GLCS):

  1. I can evaluate evidence, compare and contrast information, interpret the historical record, and develop sound historical arguments and perspectives on which informed decisions in contemporary life can be based.
  2. I can explain the basic features and differences between hunter-gatherer societies and pastoral nomads.  I can analyze and explain the geographic, environmental, biological, and cultural processes that influenced the rise of the earliest human communities, the migration and spread of people throughout the world, and the causes and consequences of growth of agriculture. 

Quarter 2: Era 2: Early Civilizations and Cultures and the Emergence of Pastoral Peoples,4000 to 1000 B.C.E./B.C.  Students will describe and differentiate defining characteristics of early civilizations.

Guiding Questions:

  1. What did the pharaohs of ancient Egypt accomplish, and how did they do it?
  2. How did social class affect daily life in ancient Egypt?
  3. How did Judaism originate and develop?
  4. What are the central teachings of Judaism, and why did they survive to modern day?
  5. What are they origins and beliefs of Hinduism?
  6. What are the main beliefs and teachings of Buddhism?

GLCS:

  1. I can describe and differentiate defining characteristics of early civilization and pastoral societies, where they emerged, and how they spread.
  2. I can analyze classical civilizations and empires and the emergence of the major world religions and large-scale empires.

Quarter 3 and 4: Era 3 Classical Traditions, World Religions, and Major Empires, 1000 B.C.E./B.C.to 300 C.E./A.D .Students will analyze the innovations and social, political, and economic changes that occurred through emergence of classical civilizations in the major regions of the world, including the establishment of five major world religions.

Guiding Questions: Quarter 3

  1. What do Shang artifacts reveal about this civilization?
  2. How did Confucianism, Daoism, and Legalism influence political rule in ancient China?
  3. In what ways did the Han Dynasty improve government and daily life in China?
  4. How did the Silk Road promote an exchange of goods and ideas?
  5. How did democracy develop in Ancient Greece?
  6. What were the major differences between Sparta and Athens?

Guiding Questions: Quarter 4

  1. Did the benefits of Roman expansion outweigh the costs?
  2. How did Christianity originate and spread?
  3. How are Christians’’ lives shaped by the beliefs and practices of Christianity?
  4. How did Islam originate and spread?

GLCS:

  1. I can analyze the civilizations and empires that emerged during this era, noting their political, economic, and social systems, and their changing interactions with the environment.
  2. I can analyze classical civilizations and empires and the emergence of the major world religions and large-scale empires.

Student scores that result in .05 or higher should be rounded up.  The following percentage scale applies.
 
100 - 91.5  = A
91.4 - 89.5 = A-
89.4 - 87.5 = B+
87.4 - 81.5 = B
81.4 - 79.5 = B-
79.4 - 77.5 = C+
77.4 - 71.5 = C 
71.4 - 69.5 = C-
69.4 - 67.5 = D+
67.4 - 61.5 = D
61.4 - 59.5 = D-
59.4 - 0      = E
 
Grades will be rounded up only to the tenth place during this calculation.  Students will only earn a passing grade for a marking period if they achieve at or above 59.45%, which rounds to 59.5%.

TO CALCULATE FINAL SEMESTER GRADE
The final semester grade is based on a composite of two nine-weeks’ grades and the final examination/culminating assessment/project.  Each nine weeks is worth approximately 43%, and the semester exam/project or District Culminating Activity assessment is worth approximately 14%.